If you have old dogs or special needs dogs, you won't want to miss this interview with Dr. Julie Buzby. Learn how to prevent your dog from slipping on hardwood floors. Click to help your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Senior and Special Needs Dogs an Interview with Dr. Julie Buzby founder of Toegrips for Dogs

Products for Special Needs Dogs and Senior Dogs

An Interview with Dr. Julie Buzby founder of Toegrips for Dogs

 

A few weeks ago, I attended the BlogPaws 2017 conference in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This was the first blogging conference I’ve attended. I guess blogging is getting real for me. 😉 I wanted to attend this blogging conference for three reasons: 1) It was in Myrtle Beach! 2) I wanted to learn more about being an effective pet blogger. And 3) I wanted to meet Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of Dr. Buzby’s Toegrips for Dogs.

About eight months ago, Dexter wore his first pair of Toegrips, and these little rubber grips have transformed his life. You can read how in my November blog post. Today, I wanted to share my interview with Dr. Buzby. Enjoy.

The word on the street is that Dr. Buzby has two more products up her sleeve! Dexter and I are waiting on pins and needles to see what she has next.


Would your dog benefit from Toegrips? Tell me in the comments.

If you have old dogs or special needs dogs, you won't want to miss this interview with Dr. Julie Buzby. Learn how to prevent your dog from slipping on hardwood floors. Click to help your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Items for special needs or senior dogs.

Friday’s Favorite Five: Products for Special Needs or Less Active Dogs

Friday’s Favorite Five: Products for Special Needs or Less Active Dogs (4/21/17)

Items for special needs or senior dogs.
Special Needs Dogs Rock

Disclaimer: This is a sponsored post and also has affiliate links. However, I will always try to offer my readers great product selections. Your trust is very appreciated, and never taken for granted. ~Tonya, Dexter and Nutter

Special Needs Dogs and Senior Dog Care

All dogs are special and have their own behavior, health, and activity requirements. Some dogs are what we may consider special-needs dogs or senior dogs that may need a little help with their daily lives or activities. This, however, does not mean that these dogs do not deserve to lead a happy, fun, and healthy lifestyle. A special-needs dog may have just a few needs or requirements to help them enjoy life to the fullest. I thought today would be a great day to spotlight 5 amazing products and brands that help our special dogs LIVE LIFE!

 

“WiggleLess has a unique and innovative design which aids in spinal column support and activity restriction in dogs. This dog back brace limits many of the movements which are known to contribute to back injuries as well as provides back support that can help prevent further exacerbation of some existing spinal conditions.” Amber Brooks, DVM Knoxville, TN Order Today!

Wiggleless Order Today
WiggleLess Order Today

 

Ever wonder why dogs slip on hard floors? Dogs use their nails for traction—engaging them like cleats digging into the ground. But hard nails can’t grip hard floors. ToeGrips are nonslip grips that fit onto dogs’ toenails to restore their natural ability to grip with their nails. Help your dog turn back the clock and rediscover confident mobility with ToeGrips. Read my review or Order Today!

ToeGrips Order Today
ToeGrips Order Today

 

GingerLead dog slings help aging or handicapped dogs with mobility and dogs recovering from orthopedic problems or procedures. They are easy to use, padded, adjustable for height, include an integrated leash for control and are machine washable. Sizes available for toy to giant breeds. Recommended by Veterinarians. Made in USA. Order Today!

GingerLead Order Today
GingerLead Order Today

 

Pet Gear Pet Strollers are used for a variety of reasons. They help avoid stress on your pet’s body if they are having trouble walking due to joint pain, arthritis, or recent surgery. Strollers also function as a crate on wheels. Wherever you go, your pet, whether it be a dog, cat, furry friend, will be able to keep you company while remaining safely contained inside the stroller. Order Today!

Muffin’s Halo Guide for Blind Dogs is a 3 piece must-have device that helps blind dogs transition to become familiar with existing or new surroundings quickly. It starts as a harness that is wrapped snuggly around a dog’s neck and torso. The wing attaches to the neck of the harness. The halo is attached to the wing and when placed on neck of the harness, the halo is just above the eye level and acts as a buffer to safeguard a blind dog’s head, nose, face and shoulders from bumping into hard surfaces. Order Today!

 


Would any of these products help your dog? Tell me in the comments.

Friday's Favorite Five: Products for Special Needs or Less Active Dogs. All dogs are special and have their own behavior, health, and activity requirements. Some dogs are what we may consider special-needs dogs or senior dogs that may need a little help with their daily lives or activities. This, however, does not mean that these dogs do not deserve to lead a happy, fun, and healthy lifestyle.
Pin It

Are you looking for even more ways to stay up to date with Raising Your Pets Naturally? Sign up for the newsletter for more tips and promotions. Don’t forget to be social and Like, Follow and Subscribe. Comments below are always welcome.

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Dr. Morgan and I thought that ToeGrips might benefit Dexter in helping him “grab” walking surfaces, so I contacted Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of ToeGrips, to see if we could try them and provide a review. Dr. Buzby was more than happy to allow Dexter and me to try a set, to see if they would provide proprioceptive stimulus and help Dexter to pick up his feet.

Dr. Buzby’s ToeGrips Review: Stopping a Dog from Slipping

Dr. Buzby’s ToeGrips Review: Assisting in Special Needs Dogs

My vet and I thought that ToeGrips might benefit Dexter in helping him “grab” walking surfaces, so I contacted Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of ToeGrips, to see if we could try them and provide a review. Dr. Buzby was more than happy to allow Dexter and me to try a set, to see if they would provide proprioceptive stimulus and help Dexter to pick up his feet.
Dr. Buzby ToeGrips Review

Disclaimer: This is a sponsored review from ToeGrips. However, I will always offer my readers an unbiased and honest account of my experiences. Your trust is very appreciated, and never taken for granted. ~Tonya, Dexter and Nutter

As a professional in the dog world, I am around dogs in different situations on a regular basis. Over my career, I have always worried when I see a dog slip on a slick floor or surface. A dog may just be walking along a tile or wood floor, and I can see that they are not walking in their normal, relaxed fashion. Some dogs also seem to have a lot of difficulty getting up from a lying position, and have to struggle to get to their feet. And it just breaks my heart watching senior dogs or dogs with arthritis or other mobility issues struggle.

About 3 years ago, a product buzzed in my head from Dexter‘s acupuncturist, Mary L. Cardeccia. We weren’t talking about Dexter’s needs, just about dog rehab in general. The product was Dr. Buzby’s ToeGrips for Dogs. Dr. Buzby’s ToeGrips are natural rubber rings that slide onto a dog’s weight-bearing toenails, adhere by friction, and give instant traction to senior, arthritic, and special needs dogs. They contact the floor at the GripZone™, where the non-slip material of the ToeGrip grips the floor in a way that the dog’s hard nail cannot.

ToeGrips sounded like a very interesting product and concept, and they stayed in the back of my mind. Now, as I saw and worked with clients and their dogs, when slippery floors were involved, I often thought of ToeGrips and how they might help that dog. Then, about a year later, I heard about them again from Dexter’s veterinary food therapist, Dr. Judy Morgan. She, too, was a fan of ToeGrips and used them in her veterinary practice and with some of her own dogs.

Finally, one night while I was teaching dog training classes at a local veterinary hospital, I saw a pair of ToeGrips in action with an old, senior dog. He was able to get up from lying on the linoleum floor with ease, and walked down the shiny floors without slipping and with what looked like a comfortable gait. From that point forward, I became a fan and started to recommend them to clients.

ToeGrips for Surgery
ToeGrips For Rehab

Recently I recommended them to a friend who had two dogs that needed extensive Tibial Tuberosity Advancement surgery. The TTA surgery is to change the alignment of the tibia bone to prevent abnormal sliding movement within the knee joint. ‘Ouch’ is right. She ordered ToeGrips for both dogs to help after surgery to prevent slipping in the kitchen and the deck. ToeGrips have been extremely helpful for this job; one dog is healed and her second only has about 6 weeks more of rehab.

Now, let’s talk a little about Dexter The Dog. If you recall, Dexter has a neurological condition, and I have noticed that Dexter has been “shuffling” his feet instead of picking them up like a “normal” dog. During one of Dexter’s examinations with Dr. Morgan, she flipped his foot over so the top of his toes were touching the ground. This was to test conscious proprioception, which means she was determining whether he was aware that his feet were upside down. Most dogs will immediately flip their feet back to the normal position, if not, they may not be getting the signal that they are standing on their toes and they will keep their paw in the upside-down position. This is what Dexter did. Dr. Morgan and I thought that ToeGrips might benefit Dexter in helping him “grab” walking surfaces, so I contacted Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of ToeGrips, to see if we could try them and provide a review. Dr. Buzby was more than happy to allow Dexter and me to try a set, to see if they would provide proprioceptive stimulus and help Dexter to pick up his feet.

The first step in the process was to measure Dexter’s toe nails to ensure I chose the correct size. I made two mistakes during this process. First, I measured in cm when they are sized in mm. Second, I measured prior to his nail trim, and the sizing wasn’t correct after his nail trim. You see, the tips of a dog’s nails tend to be thinner and sharper, hence a smaller measurement. So, trim your dog’s nails first, then make sure you are looking at the mm for your dog’s correct size.

Once I received Dexter’s ToeGrips, it was time to apply them to Dexter’s feet. The instructions state to place the ToeGrips in isopropyl alcohol first to help with the application. I placed them in a small bowl with the alcohol and called Dexter’s grandma for assistance. Grandma helped by holding and securing Dexter’s leg as I secured his foot and nail. This made it easier to apply. Application by far is the trickiest part of the process. A dog must be pretty still in order to manipulate the ToeGrip and get the right placement. I’m anticipating this will go quicker as both Dexter and I get comfortable with the routine.

Applying ToeGrips
Applying ToeGrips
ToeGrips
ToeGrips

Voila. Once they were on, Dexter did not bother with them at all. I was worried he would be so focused on them and bite them off, but that was not the case. He never even looks at them. The instructions say to check the fit each day, and we do. You want to make sure they are in position and not riding up on the toe bed where they can cause harm. Dexter has two nails that must be a little thinner, and those two nails I readjust daily. We only lost one ToeGrip and it was in the beginning and I don’t think I had them applied correctly.

Dexter wore the ToeGrips for about a week, then we visited Dr. Cardeccia and she checked the fit and said they looked good. She also flipped his foot over and he immediately flipped his foot back to position! Wow! So, it seems like the ToeGrips are providing proprioceptive stimulus for Dexter.

I recorded Dexter walking the day before applying ToeGrips and a day after wearing the ToeGrips. Each video was recorded at the same time of day after the same lounging morning. When watching the before video you can see Dexter dragging his back and front feet. In the after video, you can see that Dexter starts to lift his feet more vs. dragging. When I watched this video it gave me goosebumps to think that I’m able to provide a little assistance with Dexter’s care. I promptly emailed Dr. Buzby the video for her thoughts on what she saw. She said this, “he is actually much better in that ‘after’ video. In the ‘before’ video he is ‘pacing’ (a lateral 2-beat gait), but in the ‘after’ video, he is actually walking with a normal cadence. That tells me that either neurologically or musculoskeletally (or both), he is better!” That’s pretty amazing, and once again, some goosebump material. Dr. Buzby said we couldn’t conclude the improvement was from the ToeGrips, but since there weren’t any other variable changes, I feel it is the ToeGrips that are causing Dexter to lift his feet. Dr. Buzby told me that Dexter will likely continue to see improvement over time, but will plateau at some point.

Watch Before/After Video Above

We are now in week three, and I can see from the wear on the ToeGrips and his toenails that he is still dragging his feet a little during walks. Dr. Buzby also said, “the fact that the grips are worn on the top is also a GREAT thing, because it means that the ToeGrips are sparing the nails; i.e. the nails aren’t getting the full brunt of wear.” So, that’s another good thing. Because Dexter will be wearing his ToeGrips out quicker than normal, we will need to replace them sooner than average. Typically, ToeGrips last 1-3 months, with 8-10 weeks being the average.

Worn ToeGrips
Worn ToeGrips

Dexter and I are very happy with the assisted mobility and proprioceptive stimulus Dr. Buzby’s ToeGrips for Dogs. has given us. We not only are a fan, we are a customer. There will likely be a time in Dexter’s life that his foot dragging gets worse and he will have to wear boots to protect his feet, but that time is not now.

I am so grateful that Dr. Buzby gave Dexter a little more spring in his step. <3

Update: The second round of applying Dexter’s ToeGrips went smoothly. Dexter and I just had to find our groove in getting comfortable with the process. Grandma still helps by holding Dexter’s leg still.

ToeGrips offers a variety of tutorials to assist in the process; I suggest reviewing them prior to placing your first order.

My vet and I thought that ToeGrips might benefit Dexter in helping him “grab” walking surfaces, so I contacted Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of ToeGrips, to see if we could try them and provide a review. Dr. Buzby was more than happy to allow Dexter and me to try a set, to see if they would provide proprioceptive stimulus and help Dexter to pick up his feet.
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Order a pair of  ToeGrips with promo code: DEXTER for 10% Off

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Are you looking for even more ways to stay up to date with Raising Your Pets Naturally? Sign up for the newsletter for more tips and promotions. Don’t forget to be social and Like, Follow and Subscribe. Comments below are always welcome.

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