I’ve talked with people who are afraid to travel because they have heard so many traveling nightmares. Please don’t let these stories stop you from taking a vacation with your dog.

Travel Safety | Hotel Travel Safety Tips For You and Your Dog | Dog-Friendly Hotel Tips

Google Adsense—>



Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

I’ve talked with people who are afraid to travel. Please don’t let these stories stop you from taking a vacation with your dog. Hotel safety for you and your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Travel safety tips with dogs.

Traveling with Dogs | Safety Tips

Hotel Travel Safety Tips

 

Whether you are traveling with your dog for vacation or just a weekend getaway, safety is always important. This is particularly true if you are traveling alone. You can read my post Solo Driving With A Dog-Safety Tips for more ideas on how to stay safe. But today, I’m going to talk about keeping yourself and your dog safe during your dog-friendly hotel stay. Here are 11 hotel safety tips to get you started on a safe and fun vacation with your dog.

  1. Research Dog-Friendly Hotels: Before you even get to #2 on the list, do your research. Check out the location of the hotel, their reviews, and even a crime check of the area. Finding a hotel that is dog-friendly can also mean the hotel is less than secure. You can visit Google maps and get a pretty good idea of the area by viewing up and down the road with the Street View option.
  2. Book Your Reservation: Booking your dog-friendly accommodations ahead of time can save you a lot of grief and time checking in. You also don’t want to think you have an ideal hotel only to find out they are booked full, and you end up driving all over a new town trying to find a dog-friendly hotel. Request a room not on the ground floor (See #4).
  3. Park Close When Checking In: Park as close to the check-in, ideally under the covered port if it’s open. Unfortunately, some criminals target vacationers and nothing says vacationer like someone checking into a hotel.
  4. Checking In: When you check in, ask the front clerk not to announce your room number, to write it down and make sure your room is not on the ground floor. Being on the ground floor is easier for criminals to break into and could have unsavory people loitering around. However, being higher than floor 6 is too high for firetruck ladders. Your dog is also a consideration during this part. Assuming the weather is reasonable and I am able to park close, I leave Dexter inside his locked dog crate inside the locked car while checking in.
  5. Visual Inspection: Before moving your gear into your hotel room, check your room (without your dog). Check to ensure it is clean and up to your standards. This is also the time to make sure that nothing is left for your dog to eat like pills, candy, food wrappers, or who knows what. Check under the bed, in the corners – do a thorough visual sweep. Look at the windows and door to make sure they are secure and locked, including any adjoining rooms. Look at the evacuation card on the door, so that you know where the stairs are in case of an emergency. Check the telephone to make sure it works properly.
  6. Moving In: Once again, park as close to the elevator as you can, to make moving into your hotel room as quick and easy as possible. If the hotel provides luggage carts, this will make your move easier and hopefully with fewer trips. This is another time I keep Dexter in the car, I don’t want to have to worry about him getting in the way, trying to manage the cart, my luggage, and Dexter going up and down the elevator. Try to take the elevator alone. If not, avoid pushing your floor number until the other guests have pushed theirs. Be aware of yourself and the others in the elevator. Stay close to the elevator buttons with your back against the wall. By staying close to the elevator buttons, you will be able to hit the emergency button if needed.
  7. Bringing In Your Dog: Before you walk your dog up to your hotel room, take him for a good potty break, preferably in a well-lit location. Look for a location that is very visible to the front desk area, with people coming and going. This is not a time to be unseen. As always, pick up after your dog and do not allow him to water the ornamental flowers or outdoor furniture.
  8. During Your Stay: While you are in your hotel, keep the door locked, dead-bolted, and chained with the Do Not Disturb sign up. If your hotel does not have a deadbolt, consider bringing a portable door lock. You can also increase your safety by bringing a portable hotel room motion detector or portable door alarm. Close your curtains so people cannot view inside your room. Keep your room key and your car keys next to your nightstand for easy access. Never open the door to anyone you were not expecting. If they claim to be the hotel staff, security or a police officer, call the front desk to verify.
  9. Potty Breaks: Just like in #7, make sure to stay in an area that is visible and well-lit when you are walking your dog. Try to get your dog to do his last call before it gets too late at night and dark.
  10. Leaving Your Room: If you intend to leave your room while you stay, make sure any valuables are stored safely in the hotel safe, a portable safe or not left behind. Turn on the television, lights and place the Do Not Disturb sign on your door prior to leaving.
  11. Room Cleaning: I personally do not have the hotel staff clean my room during my stay. I will, however, get fresh towels every morning from the front desk.

I’ve talked with people who are afraid to travel because they have heard so many traveling nightmares. Please don’t let these stories stop you from taking a vacation with your dog. Bad things can happen anywhere at any time. Just be smart and safe and have a great time!

 

Do you have any hotel safety tips to share? Let me know in the comments below.
I’ve talked with people who are afraid to travel. Please don’t let these stories stop you from taking a vacation with your dog. Hotel safety for you and your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally #travelingwithdogs #travelingwithpets #dogfriendlyhotel #dogfriendly
Pin It

Are you looking for even more ways to stay up to date with Raising Your Pets Naturally? Sign up for the newsletter for more tips and promotions. Don’t forget to be social and Like, Follow and Subscribe. Comments below are always welcome.

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Instagram  YouTube   Vimeo

$50 daily credit per nights at Hilton Hotels & Resorts. Use your on-property credit for dining, shopping, relaxing, and more!


Find Great Deals at BedandBreakfast.com!
  

Google Adsense—>



Dog-Friendly Vacations and Traveling with Dogs Travel Safety Tips Hotel Safety when Traveling with Dogs

Dog-Friendly Travel Tips: Should You Leave Your Dog In A Hotel Room Alone?

Google Adsense—>



Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

 

Dog-Friendly Vacations and Traveling with Dogs Travel Safety Tips

Hotel Safety when Traveling with Dogs

Dog-Friendly Vacations and Traveling with Dogs Travel Safety Tips Hotel Safety when Traveling with Dogs
Dog-Friendly Hotels

When taking a vacation with your dog, you may find yourself staying in a dog-friendly hotel, bed and breakfast, rental home, or even a dog-friendly cabin. Being able to stay in a pet-friendly accommodation always comes with some kind of pet policy. Before booking your trip, you should read the pet policy carefully to ensure that it meets your travel needs. Some pet policies clearly state that a dog cannot be left in a room unattended, and others state a dog must be crated. But what if there isn’t a policy? Should you leave your dog unattended? Here are some things to consider before leaving Fido behind. If you haven’t read my post on Hotel Dog Etiquette, hop over and take a look at that first.

  1. Secure: Is your dog comfortable and secure in his new environment? If not, leaving your dog in a hotel room alone is not a good idea. For some dogs, traveling can be stressful, and having their humans leave during this time can cause some dogs to develop separation anxiety. Even with Dexter, I have a one day rule. The first day of our vacation or arriving at our destination, there is no leaving him. He is not a stressful dog, and travels often, but that first day he needs me. After I’ve unpacked, and we had one good night’s sleep, he is totally comfortable with the new situation.
  2. Crate Trained: If you have successfully taught your dog how to enjoy staying in his crate, you are in a better position to leave your dog alone in a hotel room. By leaving your dog in his crate that he is accustomed to, you are offering a safe area that is familiar to him. It also helps with any chances that someone will come into your room and he will run out. If you need a little help in crate training your dog, read this article.
  3. Potty Trained and No Chewing: If you are not using a dog crate and intend to leave your dog running free in the room while you leave, you better be sure that he won’t pee on anything or chew anything up.
  4. Barking: If your dog is prone to barking, whether because of stress, excitement, or noises, leaving him behind might make him a nuisance. This is particularly true if you are staying in a dog-friendly hotel or condo. If you have neighbors or there is a lot of outside noise, your dog may bark while you are away and annoy others.
  5. Location, Location, Location: Some dog-friendly accommodations are very quiet and comfortable. These tend to be more of an ideal scenario if you are leaving your dog behind while you go grab some dinner out. For me, I never would leave Dexter in a hotel room alone (except when I’m loading my car), but do leave him in the dog-friendly rental homes I rent for the week. It is pretty rare that I leave Dexter behind – after all, my vacation does revolve around Dexter – but I may want to participate in an occasional tourist thing that is not dog-friendly.
  6. Tell The Front Desk: If you are staying in a hotel and intend to leave your dog alone, tell the front desk and provide them with your cell phone number. This will allow them to contact you if your dog does become upset or needs assistance. Also, place the DO NOT DISTURB sign on the door before you leave and play Through A Dog’s Ear musical CD if you can, to help zen out the room. And don’t forget to read my Dog Travel Essentials Check List before you leave for your trip.

Remember, when you are vacationing with your dog, you are an ambassador. In order to have more dog-friendly establishments, we dog guardians need to band together and show them that we are courteous individuals who happen to have dogs as traveling companions.

Do you have any travel tips?  Please feel free to share in the comments below.
Dog-Friendly Vacations and Traveling with Dogs Travel Safety Tips. Hotel Safety when Traveling with Dogs. Should you leave your dog in a hotel room unattended?
Pin It

Are you looking for even more ways to stay up to date with Raising Your Pets Naturally? Sign up for the newsletter for more tips and promotions. Don’t forget to be social and Like, Follow and Subscribe. Comments below are always welcome.

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Instagram  YouTube   Vimeo

 The gift of a getaway 

Being an independent female, I often hit the open road with Dexter The Dog and no other people. Here are some of my best travel safety tips. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Solo Driving and Traveling With A Dog-Travel Safety Tips

Google Adsense—>



Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

Travel Safety Ideas

Women and Solo Travel Safety Tips

 

Being an independent female, I often hit the open road with Dexter The Dog and no other people. Here are some of my best travel safety tips. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Travel Safety Tips

 

Being an independent female, I often hit the open road with Dexter The Dog and no other people. Don’t get me wrong, there are times Dexter and I travel with our family or friends, but I would say the majority of our dog-friendly travels are just Dexter and me. I love these trips because I can focus on strengthening my connection with Dexter and going where the road takes us.

However, there are some precautions that I take when I travel alone to ensure I am being as safe as possible. Here are some travel safety guidelines you too might consider employing.

  1. Research the Route: Once again researching your travel route is important. Check for any road construction or detours you need to be aware of. Most smartphone apps or internet maps have an updated time of arrival and traffic map.
  2. Book Your Reservations: If you are intending to stop in various cities on your road trip, book your dog-friendly accommodations prior to leaving. The last thing you want is to be frazzled at the end of a long drive trying to find a safe, dog-friendly hotel that isn’t booked. Being stressed or tense is not conducive to safety.
  3. Share Your Itinerary: Make sure you share your travel plans with a family member or friend. Provide them with your route and addresses and phone numbers of your destinations.
  4. Call or Email: During your trip, message your family members or friends who are not traveling with you. Let them know you’re safe and where you are on your journey. This way, if you don’t check in at a reasonable time, they can worry.
  5. Potty Breaks: Remember, you and your dog need to get out and stretch. Being a solo traveler can take a toll on your body and mind while driving.
  6. Where to Stop: This is no time to put your big girl pants on and stop in the “hood.” If you are traveling on a route that has well-lighted travel plazas, these are great spots to stop for a stretch. Park close to the building and make sure it is brightly lit. When walking your dog, stay close and don’t wander too far. If the dog potty area is far away or dark, don’t go. Sorry, I always try to abide by doggy rules, but if my safety is at risk, I won’t. Of course, don’t forget to pick up after your dog does his business and don’t let him pee on ornamental flowers, gardens, or seating.
  7. Leaving Your Dog: I know, a no-no. But, if you are traveling alone, you too have to relieve yourself. When I have to leave Dexter alone in the car, he is in his travel crate with a light blanket over the top and a lock on the crate door! If it’s hot outside, I make my potty break swiftly and pack my food or hit a drive-thru. I also have a dog travel fan on Dexter’s crate. I am thinking of purchasing a portable car air conditioner to help even more for my 3-5 minute potty breaks. Yes, I timed myself!
  8. Dress Down: Not only will you want to be comfortable, but you don’t want to stand out in a crowd and have “tourist” written all over your back. Wearing comfortable shoes and clothing can go a long way if you ever feel the need to walk quickly away from a situation that makes you feel uncomfortable.
  9. Money and Credit Cards: When I travel, I stash my money in various spots throughout the car and on my person. Money belts (under your shirt) that are thin are a nice addition along with a few 20s in your pockets and even in your shoes! I typically don’t carry a purse or wallet when driving, and if I do, it doesn’t have much money inside. Never would I suggest pulling out a 20 to pay for something and flashing a wad of cash – that’s just not a good idea.
  10. Be Observant: I am always hyper-aware of my surroundings. As I’m driving or even pulling up to a travel plaza I am looking at the cars, the people walking around, and the truckers, and I park accordingly. When I’m walking from my car to the plaza or taking Dexter The Dog for his potty break, I know who is around me at all times. I do not keep my back to one spot; I am in an open, well-lit area, and I move around. If I feel someone is coming my way, I casually move to another direction. If someone tries talking to me and Dexter, I’m polite, but keep my distance and I do not allow them to close the gap between me and them.
  11. Keep Doors Locked: I drive with my doors locked and the moment I’m in my car, I lock the doors. I continue to be aware, even in the parking lot with my doors locked.
  12. Safety Devices: I am a fan of having things like an air hornpepper spray, and taser gun on me when I’m walking Dexter. This is doubly true if I’m traveling. And don’t forget, you always have your voice.
  13. Self-Defense Classes: If you are a solo traveler, taking a self-defense course wouldn’t be a bad idea. I personally haven’t done this yet, but maybe in the future. Not only will a good coach teach you valuable skills, but it certainly would be a boost for your confidence.
What are some of your travel safety tips?  Let me know in the comments.
Being an independent female, I often hit the open road with Dexter The Dog and no other people. Here are some of my best travel safety tips. #raisingyourpetsnaturally #travelsafety #womentravel #solotravel #travelalone
Pin It

 

Traveling with Dogs | Travel Safety When On The Road With Your Dog. When you and your dog are hitting the road for your dog-friendly vacation, the actual road trip can be the best part! Sometimes people are so focused on the destination, they forget to stop and smell the flowers, a part that a traveling dog really should be doing frequently. Here are my top 5 tips to make your journey to your vacation with your dog a fun one.

Traveling with Dogs | Travel Safety When On The Road With Your Dog

Google Adsense—>



Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

Dog-Friendly Vacations

How To Travel with Pets

5 tips to make your dog-friendly vacation a fun and safe trip. Dog-friendly vacations and traveling with dogs can be great if you follow a few travel safety tips. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Traveling with your dog

When you and your dog are hitting the road for your dog-friendly vacation, the actual road trip can be the best part! Sometimes people are so focused on the destination, they forget to stop and smell the flowers, a part that a traveling dog really should be doing frequently.

Here are my top 5 tips to make your journey to your vacation with your dog a fun one.

  1. Research the Route: Before you hit the road with your dog, hit the internet. Map out your journey and start to look for dog-friendly establishments, tourist spots, and parks. You can plan pit stops and potty breaks at the best spots. If you are traveling alone, this is extra important, because you need to stretch your legs.
  2. Call or Email: After your dog-friendly internet search, make sure you follow through with an email or phone call to double check that an establishment is dog-friendly and if there are specific rules for dogs. Some dog-friendly activities are specific to certain days or seasons, and it’s always possible that ownership or management has changed policies from what’s online. It’s a good idea to confirm your plans ahead of time.
  3. Potty Breaks: Stop often to stretch your legs and to get your dog out walking and sniffing. Depending on how often your dog travels, he may be a little stressed, so don’t rush him to do his business. On leash, let him sniff around and investigate. If he’s enjoying the trip, and I sure hope he does, take a little stroll around the rest area. Of course, don’t forget to pick up after he does his business!
  4. Half-Way Point: During some vacation road trips, the drive will be over 5 hours, which may indicate an overnight stay or two. These overnight retreats can be just as fun as the end destination. A little research can lead to a really fun day. When Dexter The Dog and I travel, we tend to leave at 3 am or 4 am to ensure our day trip will have plenty of time to enjoy the dog-friendly town of choice.
  5. Take Photos: That’s a given, right? Taking our dogs on dog-friendly vacations is so much fun and having great photos helps us relive the trip. Don’t be shy – snap a selfie or two!


Do you have any pet travel tips to share? Tell me in the comments.

5 tips to make your dog-friendly vacation a fun and safe trip. Dog-friendly vacations and traveling with dogs can be great if you follow a few travel safety tips. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Pin it

Are you looking for even more ways to stay up to date with Raising Your Pets Naturally? Sign up for the newsletter for more tips and promotions. Don’t forget to be social and Like, Follow and Subscribe. Comments below are always welcome.

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Instagram  YouTube  Vimeo