How to stop a dog from jumping on you. Step one, teach your dog a reliable sit behavior. Step two, teach your dog to read your mind. Learn How. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

How to Stop a Dog from Jumping up on You | Teaching a Dog to Sit for Greeting and Petting

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Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

How to Stop a Dog from Jumping on You

Teaching a Dog to Sit for Attention and Petting

How to stop a dog from jumping on you. Step one, teach your dog a reliable sit behavior. Step two, teach your dog to read your mind. Learn How. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Teach a dog to sit not jump.

Sit is a great behavior to teach all puppies and dogs right away. By teaching a reliable sit behavior, you will be able to ask your dog to sit his butt down instead of jumping. Once your dog understands the idea of sitting, you can ask your dog to offer a sit when they want something like attention, food, toy playing or just about anything else. In these lessons, I will teach you the various steps in teaching your dog to sit, and the various steps in teaching you to teach your dog to offer the sit behavior without being asked.

Grab a handful of rewards and keep your lessons short (no more than 5 minutes at a time). Advance through levels when your dog is mastering the session 5/5. At every new training session, go back a level when you start for the best success. If at any time your dog isn’t successful, repeat the level or go back a level to get success.

Level 1

  • Put the treat right to your dog’s nose and move your hand slowly in an arc above your dog’s head and back
  • As soon as his rump hits the floor say “YES!” and follow quickly with a treat. Repeat 5 times

Level 2

  • Remove the food lure from your hand
  • Make the same motion of luring your dog into a sit position
  • As soon as his rump hits the floor say “YES!” and treat (treat was in your opposite hand). Repeat 5 times

Level 3

  • Say your Sit cue just before you lure with your empty hand
  • As soon as his rump hits the floor say “YES!” and treat (treat was in your opposite hand). Repeat 5 times

Level 4

  • Do a rep of Level 3
  • Now, on your next trial, say your Sit cue, without your hand lure
  • As soon as your dog sits, say “YES!” and treat (treat was in your opposite hand). Repeat 5 times
  • Adding Distractions– when you are asking your dog to work on his sit behavior around distractions such as being outside, around guests or other dogs, you must start the training process over at Level 1 and rebuild. Just because your dog is performing his sit cue in the living room does not mean he can do the same behavior outside. He must learn this process just like he learned it in the living room.

Offering The Sit After you have practiced various lessons with your dog on the sit behavior, it’s time to teach your dog to read your mind! This is easier than it sounds. Do a round of Sit sessions. After, say, 3 sets, just smile at your dog, do not provide any luring or words. As soon as his butt hits the floor say “YES!” and give him a jackpot of treats. Quickly take a few playful steps away from your dog and stop and smile at him again. As soon as his butt hits the floor again, say “YES!” and treat. Repeat this for a total of 5 times.

You can vary the offered sit by doing the same process before other events that your dog wants to participate in. For example, if you are about ready to toss your dog’s ball during a game of fetch, hold the ball close to your chest, smile at your dog and wait. As soon as his butt hits the floor, toss the ball. If your dog jumps up at you and the ball, do not say anything, just wait for the correct behavior. This is part of the learning process. He will be learning that the “jumping up” behavior does NOT get him access to things he wants, but the “butt on the ground” behavior does – a very good life lesson for your puppy to learn.

Tip: Do not tell your dog to sit during these lessons; the point of the offered sit is that your dog is thinking through the process and realizing on his own that sit makes good things happen and jumping up does not.


Do you have a polite greeter or jumper on your hands? Tell me in the comments.

How to stop a dog from jumping on you. Step one, teach your dog a reliable sit behavior. Step two, teach your dog to read your mind. Learn How. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Teaching A Dog Not To Jump-Your Guests

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Learn How To Teach A Dog Not To Jump

Polite Dog To Person Greeting Behavior

Jumping, body slamming, mouthing….oh boy! Having a dog can be challenging at times and a lot of work when you don’t have the proper tools or training to teach them a more appropriate response. First, it’s always important to remember that dogs are dogs. They are not humans, and they do not know what we consider right or wrong, unless we teach them. Yes, we actually have to spend time and teach them what we prefer, and these lessons take time and patience.
If you haven’t read my previous posts Teaching A Dog Not To Jump-You First and Polite Dog and Human Greeting Pt. 1, I highly suggest reading those first, then coming back to this post. Now that you are caught up, let’s continue our talk about teaching your dog to keep four on the floor while greeting your houseguests.


YOUR GUESTS: 
Some challenges with teaching your dog to greet your guests politely are that your guests don’t listen (or care), their timing is off, or you feel insecure about following through with a plan. How you manage and work through this situation will determine your dog’s success. If you truly want a polite greeter at the end, you must remember that your dog is learning all the time, so make sure he his learning what YOU want him to learn. You’re the one who lives with him, not your guests or in-laws.

MANAGEMENT: Management, management, management is always the best way to start a successful

Teaching a dog not to jump
Keeping Your Dog Busy

dog training program. Have you ever wondered why dog trainers can teach a dog a reliable behavior effortlessly? It’s because we start all our training programs with a high management protocol. If you are able to prevent your dog from running and jumping on your guest, you will then be able to teach him a better greeting behavior. If, on the other hand, he performs this act over and over again he will get quite good at jumping, and this will become his ritual. Planning ahead when you know guests are going to arrive and having a plan of action for when they surprise you are the best tools. A prepared frozen dog treat toy is always a good backup for surprises.

 

Teach a dog not to jump
Stuffed Dog Food Toy

TETHER, HARNESS, AND STUFFED TREAT TOYS: When you are expecting guests, put your dog’s harness on and prepare a filled hollow treat toy. Decide which room you and your guests are going to reside in and place a tether (leash) around a heavy piece of furniture such as a sofa leg. When the doorbell rings, collect your dog and attach him to the tether by his harness and provide him with his filled hollow toy.

Go to the door and greet your guests. Take off their coats, say hello and ask them to ignore your dog. When you walk into the main room where your dog is chewing on his very delicious stuffed treat toy, sit next to your dog. Occasionally add a bonus dog treat while he continues with his chew toy. Once he is finished with his chew toy, attach his leash to his harness, then unclip him from the sofa, but do not leave. Work on some of his obedience behaviors (sithand target, down, etc.). Reward him for paying attention to you. When your dog can easily focus on you, proceed to the next step. This may NOT happen in one session.

 

When your dog is ready for the next step, ask one of your seated guests to reach down toward her shin and wiggle her fingers. As she does, walk your dog up to the guest and tell him to say hello. As soon as your dog sniffs your friend’s fingers say “YES!” and quickly move your dog a foot away and give him a treat. Be careful not to jerk your dog, remember he’s still on his leash and harness. This process is teaching your dog to politely sniff your guest’s fingers (not jumping up), and then by quickly removing your dog, he does not have time to get too excited, and start jumping up. Remember, you are teaching your dog what to do, so you don’t want to give him the opportunity to be wrong. Repeat this process for 5 repetitions. As your dog gets the hang of this, you can allow a little longer sniffing before calling him off. By calling your dog away from your guests to collect his reward, he is also learning that you are more exciting.

When you are done practicing, keep your dog leashed to you. Only when you start to have a reliable behavior, with no jumping, should your dog be allowed to run freely with guests. Remember, prevention is the key. It will not do you any good to practice these lessons, then to unleash your dog for him to start jumping around on your guests. If you do not wish to have him leashed with you, you can use another management tool such as tethering him in sight, baby gated, or put him in his crate. When you start to consider allowing him more roaming freedom, he should respond well to The Name Game.

REMEMBER #1: Management #2: Practice and certainly #3: Patience

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Teaching a dog not to jump

Teaching a Dog Not To Jump Up on You

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Teaching a Dog Not To Jump Up on You

Polite Dog Greeting: Not Jumping on You

Dogs are very social creatures, and a friendly dog’s initial greeting reaction is to sniff and lick our faces. Since we are taller than the average dog, this means they jump up to say hello. This isn’t something we humans particularly appreciate, or at least not all the time. And if you are the “not all the time” kind of person, I urge you to make that a “never.” Dogs have a hard time knowing when we think it’s ok, and when we would rather they didn’t. They don’t know the difference between your Sunday best and your grubby weekend attire.

Teaching your dog not to jump up during greeting isn’t about teaching your dog what not to do, but rather teaching your dog what TO DO. You can teach your dog to go find his toy, go to his crate, keep four on the floor, or put his butt on the ground. I tend to teach butt on the ground behaviors first.

I love teaching dogs and coaching dog parents how to teach their dogs to ask politely with their butt on the ground when they want something. If a dog wants petting, wants you to toss the dog toy, eat dinner, go outside….butt on the ground first. And I don’t want you to have to tell your dog to put his butt on the ground / SIT, I want him to do it automatically. I think by teaching our dogs to think for themselves, they understand a concept much better, and it sticks.

First, you must teach your dog at least an idea of the SIT behavior before you can expect him to offer it on his own. Put a healthy dog treat right to your dog’s nose, and move your hand slowly in an arc above your dog’s head and back. As soon as his rump hits the floor say “YES!” and follow quickly with a treat. Repeat this process until he is easily putting his butt on the ground. Tip: If your dog is leaping to get the treat, your treat lure is too high. Place your hand with the treat right ON his nose, so there isn’t any jumping to follow your lure, or to eat the treat.

Now that your dog has a basic understanding of putting his butt on the ground, it’s time to build on that so he will offer this behavior when he wants something. Again, this will lead to an offered sit for your attention instead of jumping.

Grab a handful of high-value treats or healthy dog food and do a quick round of SIT sessions. After, say, 3 sets, just smile at your dog, do not provide any luring or words. As soon as his butt hits the floor say “YES!” and give him a jackpot of treats. Quickly take a few playful steps away from your dog and stop and smile at him again. As soon as his butt hits the floor again, say “YES!” and treat. Repeat this game running around the house or yard.

 

You can vary the offered  sit by doing the same process before other events that your dog wants to participate in. For example, if you are ready to toss your dog’s ball during a game of fetch, hold the ball close to your chest, smile at your dog and wait. As soon as his butt hits the floor, toss the ball. If your dog jumps up at you and the ball, do not say anything, just wait for the correct behavior. This is part of the learning process. He will be learning that the “jumping up” behavior does NOT get him things he wants, but the “butt on the ground” behavior does – a very good life lesson for your dog to learn. Tip: Do not tell your dog to sit during these lessons; the point of the offered sit is that your dog is thinking through the process and realizing on his own that sit makes good things happen and jumping up does not.

Now that you have incorporated various offered SIT behaviors with your dog for a variety of days and sessions, start to wait for your dog to SIT before you greet him. He doesn’t have to SIT/STAY, but if he jumps up, stop his attention and wait for the SIT again, and immediately pet and/or treat. You will be amazed at how quickly your dog can learn to offer a SIT instead of jumping. But you must be consistent. No flip-flopping: it’s ok one day but not another.


Is your dog a polite greeter?  Tell me in the comments.

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Teaching a dog not to jump

Teaching A Dog Not To Jump|Polite Greeting

Teaching A Dog Not To Jump

Polite Dog and Person Greeting

“Can I pet your dog?” This may be a question you hear and start to worry about how your dog will greet a stranger. Will your dog jump on your guest? Will your dog knock your guest over when saying hello?

Why do dogs even jump up on people? In most cases, it is just because we are taller than they are, and they’re trying to get to our faces for a social greeting. This is a pretty normal dog behavior, but something most humans do not appreciate. This article is the first in a series that will start you and your dog on a better path to polite dog and human greeting behaviors.

Your Family: First let’s address how you and your family greet your dog. After a long day at work, you are probably eager to see your dog and start baby talking your dog, “Dexter, I’ve missed you so much! Oh, you are such a handsome boy!” If you are speaking to your dog in a high-pitched, excited tone, you are likely going to increase his excitement and your dog will start to get bouncy and jumpy. So, let’s tone it down a bit.

Walk in your house calmly and smile softly at your dog. “Hiiii, Deexxter.” Quickly squat down to your dog’s level and gently rub his chest and talk very softly to him. If he jumps up, stand up and ignore him until he gets all four on the floor again. Repeat. It will be a bit of a Yo-Yo exercise for you. Don’t yell at him, don’t tell him “off,” just stand up and ignore him. My rule is I have an “Invisible Dog” when my dog is jumping up on me (or barking for attention). As soon as those feet go back down, he reappears.

Teaching a dog not to jump
Sit Not Jump Up

Fast Tip: You can jump start your dog’s polite greeting behavior by the use of food or toys. When greeting your dog, coming home from work, or letting your dog out of his crate, have some dog treats or dog food on you or in your pocket. As soon as you see your dog, drop a dog treat or dog food kibble at his feet. Repeat as soon as he finishes eating the treat. Do this as you walk around with your dog or take your dog outside to potty. As your dog gets better at this routine, your kibble drops will be spaced out more. Instead of a kibble drop every second, it’s every 3 seconds, 5 seconds, etc. until they are no longer needed.

To use a toy in polite dog greeting behavior, you must first find a toy your dog thinks is very exciting, that he eagerly wants to fetch or hold. Sometimes this means having a cupboard full of new dog toys to keep them interesting and engaging. As soon as you see your dog, wiggle the toy and toss. You may need to have a few toys in your hand so you can keep tossing as you walk around with your dog. Again, this is a behavior you can fade over time.

Exercise and Attention: Please remember that your dog needs to be adequately exercised every day both physically and mentally. If your dog does not get physical and mental quality bonding time with you, he is unlikely to be successful. If you are unsure if you provide your dog with enough exercise and attention, keep a log book for a week. Write down your daily activities with your dog. And when I say “with your dog” I mean that you are actually paying attention to and bonding with. Not that your dog is lying on the floor in the same room. Dogs are Man’s/Woman’s Best Friends for a reason. They need you and your attention.

Read the second installment of polite greeting!


Is Your Dog A Polite Greeter?  Tell me in the comments.

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