DIY Dog Grooming at Home. Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog's Hair. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

DIY Dog Grooming at Home | Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog’s Hair ~ Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Demo Video

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DIY Dog Grooming at Home | Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog’s Hair

Grooming, Trimming and Brushing a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

DIY Dog Grooming at Home. Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog's Hair. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Dog Grooming at Home

No, I’m not a professional dog groomer, nor do I play one on TV. I do, however, bathe, groom, and clip Dexter at home. This article is to share with you my techniques and what has worked for my dog grooming at home. If you are looking for a more professional look, I would highly recommend taking your dog to your local groomer or even taking a few pet grooming courses yourself. If you don’t have a groomer you love, ask your friends for recommendations.

Watch The DIY Grooming Video

How Often to Give a Dog a Bath

It depends. That’s a great answer to almost any question. But it really does. If you are using a natural dog shampoo that is free of harsh chemicals and preservatives, you can feel comfortable bathing your dog as often as needed. For Dexter, during allergy season, he tends to get a bath every two weeks. During the off-season, it’s more like every three to four weeks.

How Often to Brush a Dog

Ideally, this would be daily! Brushing and combing your dog daily will not only assist in keeping your dog’s coat tangle-free, but it is also a great way to examine your dog. Dog grooming isn’t just about getting a clean and shiny dog; it’s also a way to bond with your dog and check him over for lumps and bumps. If you brush your dog daily, you are unlikely to have any tangles or mats to deal with. If your dog is uncomfortable being brushed or touched, read my article Stress-Free Dog Brushing.

Dexter’s Daily Brushing Routine

When brushing your dog, it’s important to go slowly and to be gentle. You can talk to your dog and even give your dog a healthy treat during the process. You want grooming to be enjoyable for both you and your dog.

When I brush Dexter, I start at the top of his head and work my way down. I typically rotate between a steel dog grooming comb and a slicker brush. The first big part for Dexter is his big, fluffy ears. It’s important for long-haired dogs like Dexter to get every nook and cranny so that they do not develop mats. I gently lift Dexter’s ears up as I comb underneath his ears. If I do find a snaggle, then I hold the mat at the base and start at the end and work my way up to the base. After working the underside of his ears, I do the outside of his ears. I do this the same way, from the top down, unless there is a mat or tangle.

Next, I work my way from under his neck and chest area. After his chest, I ask Dexter to lie down and roll over to his side. I then proceed to brush under his armpits, belly, legs, side and hips. When manipulating his legs to brush under them, I am careful to make sure I am gently moving his legs in a natural fashion.

How to Trim a Dog’s Furry Feet

Some dogs, such as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, have what are referred to as slippers on their feet. Some people call them Grinch feet. The breed standard suggests keeping the Cavalier’s slippers intact on top. However, it’s important to keep the underside of a dog’s foot clean and fur-free. This excess hair can actually knot up inside the paw pads and cause slipping and injury.

DIY Dog Grooming at Home. Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog's Hair. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Cavalier Grinch Feet

I do not follow show standards, and I do trim the top of Dexter’s feet, too. He’s a pretty active boy and his furry feet act as sponges! If you decide to keep the tops of your dog’s feet furry, it’s important to brush the fur between the pads regularly, so they do not develop mats. Simply place your finger in between the toes and bring the fur upward to comb.

DIY Dog Grooming at Home. Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog's Hair. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Trimming Feet

For Dexter, I ask him to lie down and flip him to one side. I then gently pick up one foot as I take the clippers and move the edge of the clipper inside the toe pad and scoop the fur out. Be careful not to dig too deep with the clippers; you don’t want to cause a burn or rash.


Do You Groom Your Dog at Home? Tell me in the comments.

DIY Dog Grooming at Home. Basic Dog Grooming and How to Cut a Dog's Hair. #raisingyourpetsnaturally #doggrooming #diygrooming
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Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Dexter The Dog’s Eight Birthday Celebration

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How to Celebrate a Dog’s Birthday

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Celebrate Daily

What can I say? I just love Dexter so much. “To the moon and back,” as I always say. Or, “It’s all about Dexter.” But really, it is.

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
To the moon and back

I’ve always been a dog lover—no, an animal lover. There’s just something about the way animals behave and love that has me mesmerized. I’ve been lucky to have lived with my fair share of amazing dogs and cats over the years, but there’s just something different about the relationship I have with Dexter.

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Meeting Grandma

My Heart Dog. That’s Dexter. When I met Dexter on November 15, 2009, at 5 weeks of age, and brought him home at 12 weeks, I never knew that Dexter was going to become my world. But it didn’t take long before I knew we had something special. For Dexter, I think he knew the first day we met!

Picking Out Dexter

Before Dexter, there was Theo. Theo was cursed with extreme dog anxiety. He was terrified of thunderstorms, loud noises, and fireworks; he had separation anxiety and dog-to-dog reactivity. Theo taught me more than I ever could have imagined, and I thank him for allowing me to care for him throughout his life.

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Still in my car today

Because of Theo’s stress, I knew I was going to be very proactive with Dexter’s care and puppy training. We went to puppy training class 2-3 times a week. Okay, grandma took him through the dog training classes I taught. 😉 We went on daily dog adventures for puppy socialization. I worked hard on preventing dog behavioral problems such as separation anxiety and thunder phobia. We took dog-friendly vacations together. You name it—we did it.

Picking out a puppy
Car ride home

Maybe it’s the fact that Dexter has been my constant companion since day one, or maybe there is just something extra-special about him—I don’t know. But the end result is the same. I love him to pieces, and I will do anything and everything I possibly can to ensure he has the best, fullest life possible.

Puppy's first Christmas
Dexter’s first Christmas

September 2012 would be a life-altering month for me. Dexter was diagnosed with Chiari-like malformation (CM) and Syringomyelia (SM). In a nutshell, the base of Dexter’s skull pushes into his spinal cord and obstructs the normal flow of spinal fluid. This causes the spinal fluid to build up pressure at the base of the neck, forming fluid-filled cavities along his spine. Unfortunately, there really isn’t any successful cure, and the disease is progressive.

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Seriously, I love him!

Dexter’s diagnosis shook me to my core. I couldn’t imagine my life without him, or worse yet, him in pain. However, I am happy to report that over the last 5 years, I have been working with Dexter in a variety of ways to keep his symptoms at bay and to continue to provide Dexter with the quality of life he deserves. If anything, this disease has brought Dexter and me closer, and just proves that we have to live each day to the fullest and have no regrets.

Cavalier puppy photos
Love him to bits

Even though today is Dexter’s 8th birthday, it really isn’t any more special than any other day we have together. I don’t want to celebrate Dexter’s life once a year; I want to celebrate his life daily! In honor of Dexter’s birthday, I am asking you to do two things, starting today.

  1. Please donate or volunteer at your favorite pet rescue. These amazing animals are just waiting for someone to come along and help them learn about love and respect. We will be donating to Cavalier Rescue USA in honor of Dexter’s life.
  2. Please, please, LIVE LIFE DAILY with your pets. They are on this earth for such a short time, so cherish every moment you have with them. We only get one shot at making it a good one. They want your attention more than anything else. Now, go.


How do you celebrate your pets? Tell me in the comments.

Dexter The Dog’s 8th Birthday Celebration. Today is a day to remember to live and enjoy life to the fullest. Read Dexter's inspiring story. #raisingyourpetsnaturally #dogbirthday
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Learn how essential oils for pets can help their behavior and pet anxiety. Essential oils for dog's anxiety problems can help with their overall training plan. Learn how. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Essential Oils for Dogs, Cats, and Pets | Essential Oils for Pets’ Behavioral Health

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Essential Oils for Dogs, Cats, and Pets

Using Essential Oils for Pets’ Behavioral Health

Learn how essential oils for pets can help their behavior and pet anxiety. Essential oils for dog's anxiety problems can help with their overall training plan. Learn how. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Essential oils for anxiety

Today is part three of a series with Isla Fishburn, Ph.D.: Essential Oils for Pet’s Behavioral Health. It is important to read Part One, the Basics of Essential Oils and Pets, before jumping in below. Now, this is the topic that I have a vested interest in. I’ve spent the last two decades working with clients and their pets’ behavioral issues, particularly canine anxiety.

Essential Oils for Pets’ Behavioral Health by Isla Fishburn, Ph.D. Part 3

Calming:

  • Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis). This oil provides a calming action for pets that are suffering from anxious or nervous behaviors, or for those animals who are consumed with worry. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Hops (Humulus lupulus). Hops can be an effective oil to help calm an animal who is anxious, nervous, or where irritability might be seen in your pet. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Valerian root (Valeriana officinalis). Valerian root is a relaxant and mild sedative. It offers calming and soothing support for your pet where there is anxiety, panic or tension.
  • Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans). Nutmeg can help to ground an animal who is anxious, hyperactive and where their energy is scattered. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Amongst it several uses, lavender can be used to soothe and comfort an animal who is suffering from distress and/or anxiety. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Fear:

  • Frankincense (Boswellia carterii). On its own, or with the support of other essential oils that help reduce emotions of fear in an animal, Frankincense can help distance an animal where there are stress and commotion. It can support a pet who is showing fear, on many levels and where a dog may be breathing heavily as a result of fear related issues. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Violet Leaf (Viola odorata). If an animal is shocked or showing hesitancy/wariness then violet leaf can support an animal who is expecting to see, hear, smell or be exposed to a bad experience. It can support an animal who is nervous and provides comfort and reassurance. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Linden Blossom (Tilia cordata). On its own, or with the support of other essential oils that can help a fearful animal, Linden blossom can provide a sense of feeling of trust and safety. It can support an animal who is fearful and who has suffered abuse. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Sandalwood (Santalum austrocaledonicum). As well as providing support at a physical level, Sandalwood can support animals who also have emotional imbalances, particularly where there is worry and uncertainty. It can be very effective on its own, or in combination with other essential oils. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Aggression:

  • Rose Otto (Rosa damascena). Rose Otto provides deep emotional support for animals that have been subject to suffering, trauma and/or neglect. It can sometimes be used to remove unwanted aggression that the animal displays. Rose Otto can often be a difficult essential oil for an abused, neglected or terrified animal to work with and it also comes with a caution; an animal may release unwanted negative behaviors when using Rose Otto, meaning an animal may react negatively and aggressively before positive results are seen. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides). Vetiver provides comfort and reassurance for an anxious pet who may show aggression or where an animal is showing aggression through assertive behaviors towards another individual. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia). This essential oil has comforting and nurturing qualities for an animal that has nervous tension or where the animal is displaying irritability and anger. Animals that have been known to bite can often use it or try and bite when they become irritated or angry. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Clary sage (Salvia sclarea). Often used for female animals, it can also be used for males that show anger, mood swings, and frustration. It provides relaxing, calming and soothing effects. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Along with its ability to heal physical imbalances, yarrow can work on its own or in combination with other oils to support an animal who has emotional imbalances through being over-sensitive or being at the hands of neglect and abuse. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Loneliness/sadness:

  • Neroli (Citrus aurantium). On its own or along side Mimosa, this can often be a difficult essential oil for an animal to accept. It can offer support for an animal who is suffering with depression or has deep loss, sadness or loneliness. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Mimosa (Acacia decurrens). On its own or along side Neroli, Mimosa offers feelings of comfort and support where an animal has been subject to loss and/or separation. Peppermint (Mentha piperita). This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

With the help of Isla Fishburn, various books on essential oils and pets, and the online workshops I attended, I am much more confident in recommending the use of essential oils and pets, particularly for behavioral issues. But my education on essential oils and pets does not stop here. I will continue to learn what I can about their uses and their precautions, and I urge you to do the same if you are interested in learning more about essential oils and dogs and cats. Thank you for joining me in this three-part series.

Essential oils for dogs and pets
Isla Fishburn PhD

Isla Fishburn Ph.D. is a canine wellness practitioner who owns Kachina Canine Communication in Northumberland, United Kingdom. As a canine wellness practitioner, Isla focuses on the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of a dog and how to support your dog in returning him/her back to balance. Isla works with both captive wolves and domestic dogs and teaches canine wellness and balanced behavior courses, consults for a raw food company in the UK and uses a range of holistic therapies to support a dog’s wellness. Isla has a BSc in Zoology and a Masters and PhD in Conservation Biology. She is also a caninepharmacognosy practitioner, offering a range of essential oils to canines to balance their vibrational states and return the animal back to normal functioning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Have you used essential oils with your pets? Tell me in the comments.

Learn how essential oils for pets can help their behavior and pet anxiety. Essential oils for dog's anxiety problems can help with their overall training plan. Learn how. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Dog Separation Anxiety Books
Treating separation anxiety in dogs.

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Immune Booster for Dogs! A dog's immune system can sometimes need a little boost. Check out some healthy foods for dogs and this dog essential oil DIY to help boost a dog's immune. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Immune Booster for Dogs | Essential Oil Remedy To Boost Dog Immune System

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Immune Booster for Dogs

DIY Boost Dog’s Immune System Essential Oil Blend

Immune Booster for Dogs! A dog's immune system can sometimes need a little boost. Check out some healthy foods for dogs and this dog essential oil DIY to help boost a dog's immune. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Boost a dog’s immune

 

Dexter The Dog is approaching 8 years of age. As he ages and as his disease progresses, I’m constantly looking for natural ways to support his health. I provide Dexter a natural home-cooked diet, healthy dog supplements, dog rehabilitation, exercise, daily walks, and lots of dog play. He seems to be a pretty happy boy.

What I have noticed over the last year is that it seems that his little dog immune system may be struggling. There are a few signs such as a yeasty face, feet, and mouth. One of his ears is also developing a tiny bit of yeast. Dog yeast can grow from a poor diet or diet high in carbohydrates such as grains, potatoes, and legumes. Now, in the right proportion, there is nothing wrong with these foods, but a year ago I eliminated them from Dexter’s diet to see if that made a difference, and it did not.

My other clue that Dexter’s immune system may be struggling is that over the past five months, I have found two ticks. Now, that may not seem like a big deal, but for over four years we have been tick- and flea-free with natural tick and flea sprays. When a dog’s immune system struggles, they are more susceptible to parasites and creepy crawlers. Read how to make DIY dog tick spray.

A lot of natural remedies can help offer immune support for dogs. The first thing I always turn to for Dexter’s health is food. Foods that are immune boosters for dogs include oranges, bell peppers, almonds, spinach, and broccoli. Herbs and extracts such as garlic, ginger, turmeric, Echinacea, and olive leaf extract can also support the immune system. Daily dog probiotics are a must in our home. By using a dog probiotic, you can increase your dog’s gut health, increase the good bacteria, fight off the bad bacteria, and boost the immune system.

Immune Booster for Dogs! A dog's immune system can sometimes need a little boost. Check out some healthy foods for dogs and this dog essential oil DIY to help boost a dog's immune. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Dexter The Dog

I’m a person who likes to add layers when tackling a medical or behavioral issue. Over the years, I have attended workshops on essential oils for pets, read various books, and researched online about whether essential oils are safe for dogs and cats.

Essential oils can be very helpful in assisting with medical and behavioral concerns, but they are also very volatile and potent. Dogs and cats should NOT be treated as small humans or kids. They are completely different creatures. A dog is different than a cat, too. In your head, you know this. Think about foods that are toxic to pets and safe for humans. Or toxic to a cat, but safe for a dog. The same is true for essential oils and the dosing of essential oils. This is why, during my research, I’m drawn to professionals truly working with essential oils for pets, not just a person well-versed in essential oils for people. Some common essential oils you may see in pet products that I personally avoid are anise, clove, oregano, red or white thyme, and wintergreen. This is also why I don’t just take one research source; instead, I gather a lot of information, then draw my own personal conclusion. The same should go for you. Don’t just take my word for it, do your research, too! Read my interview with Isla Fishburn Ph.D on essential oils and hydrosols and pets.

Determining the quality of an essential oil for our pets is extremely important and actually very difficult! Label terms such as “veterinary formula,” “therapeutic grade,” and the like truly do not have any real meaning or regulations. Digging around on the essential oil’s website to learn about the growers is the best way to determine quality. I’m still learning this, so I will do my best to link to high-quality essential oils for your pets. The other important thing to note is the Latin name. For example, above I stated I don’t recommend red or white thyme essential oils, but you may see me post a recipe with “thyme,” But, I’m using Thymus vulgaris ct thujanol, which is milder than the other two thyme varieties, which have higher phenol content than thymus vulgaris ct thujanol. Confusing, I know!

So, let’s get to the Essential Oil Blend for Dogs to Boost a Dog’s Immune System

Immune Booster for Dogs | Essential Oil Remedy For Dogs

Directions

Using an amber or cobalt bottle helps ensure the essential oils are properly stored. Light, heat, moisture, and oxygen all affect the oils’ properties and expiration date, so by properly storing your dog’s immune-boosting mix, you will be able to maintain potency.

How to Apply Your Dog’s Essential Oil Immune Booster

  • Massage 1-4 drops into your dog’s neck and chest daily.


Have you used essential oils with your dog? Tell me in the comments.

Immune Booster for Dogs! A dog's immune system can sometimes need a little boost. Check out some healthy foods for dogs and this dog essential oil DIY to help boost a dog's immune. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Common essential oils for dogs. Essential oils for dog allergies and itchy skin, ears and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Essential Oils for Pets’ Medical Conditions

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Essential Oils for Dogs, Cats, and Pets

Using Essential Oils for a Pet’s Medical Condition

Common essential oils for dogs. Essential oils for dog allergies and itchy skin, ears and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Essential oils for dogs

Today is Part Two of a series with Isla Fishburn, Ph.D.: How Essential Oils can help with medical conditions. It is important to read Part One, the Basics of Essential Oils and Pets before jumping in below. Even more importantly, please speak with your holistic veterinarian FIRST before using an essential oil for a medical condition. Just because essential oils are natural, does not mean they can be used without precautions. Some oils should not be used with some medical conditions or medications. I cannot stress enough the importance of working with your holistic veterinarian.

Essential Oils for Pets’ Medical Conditions by Isla Fishburn, Ph.D. Part 2

“There are many essential oils that may improve and support your pet’s wellness but there are too many to list them all here. However, below you can find a few of the more commonly used essential oils to provide health benefits for your pet, but note there are many more, which may better suit your pet than those listed here. It is worth noting that given the many bioactive constituents present in just one essential oil (e.g. yarrow has over 50 different chemical compounds) it is widely agreed that an essential oil provides health benefits of which we know nothing about. Sometimes your pet will want an essential oil for reasons we do not know.

Stomach support:

  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale). This oil not only provides anti-inflammatory support (see pain list) but can also aid in digestive issues and calm the stomach, especially where there may be nausea. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can provide several health benefits. One of these is to provide support for the stomach, where there is discomfort and needs a soothing effect. If your pet is suffering from nerve pain DO NOT apply peppermint topically as peppermint excites neurons and can intensify nerve pain. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare). Fennel can support the stomach where there are muscular cramps, pains and provides a soothing effect to the smooth stomach muscles. It also stimulated digestion.  This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Black pepper (Piper nigrum). As well as being a great oil for soothing muscular aches and pains, black pepper can also provide digestive support for the stomach. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
Common essential oils for dogs. Essential oils for dog allergies and itchy skin, ears and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Benefits of Essential Oils and Dogs

Inflammation/Pain:

  • Black pepper (Piper nigrum). This oil can provide as a muscle rub and soothes aching muscles. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. Your dog may wish to have black pepper applied topically on an area that is strained, bruised or aching.
  • Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can be used to stimulate nerve endings that are causing numbness. It can also provide anti-inflammatory effects and soothe burns. If your pet is suffering from nerve pain DO NOT apply peppermint topically as peppermint excites neurons and can intensify nerve pain. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale). Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties that can soothe your pet if s/he has aches or discomfort. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). As well as having properties that can support your pet’s emotional imbalances, Yarrow provides relief and support on burns and wounds. It also provides pain relief at much deeper levels of the body (e.g. tissue damage). This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita). German Chamomile is similar to Yarrow in its support for relieving pain. It is also very good for soothing the skin or where there are other dermal irritations. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Skin: 

  • Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). As well as having properties that can support your pet’s emotional imbalances, Yarrow provides relief and support for skin issues and irritations. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita). German Chamomile is similar to Yarrow in its support for the skin. It is also very good for soothing the skin or where there are other dermal irritations, including dermatitis or inflamed skin. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can cool and soothe skin that is hot, itchy and irritated. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. If not needed, peppermint can irritate the skin.
Common essential oils for dogs. Essential oils for dog allergies and itchy skin, ears and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Natural Dog Care

Anti-Bacterial:

  • Thyme (Thymus vulgaris). Thyme is a very strong immunostimulant, meaning it supports the immune system. It is also very good as an anti-bacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Lemon (Citrus limon). This essential oil serves several health benefits. Not only can it support a dog emotionally but it is also an immunostimulant and strong antibacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. This oil is photo-reactive, meaning it reacts in sunlight. Only apply topically if you are guided by a professional to do so.
  • Bergamot (Citrus bergamia). Not only is this essential oil good for skin conditions but it is also an effective anti-bacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. This oil is photo-reactive, meaning it reacts in sunlight. Only apply topically if you are guided by a professional to do so.

There are some other essential oils that can have great anti-bacterial effects. However, they are very potent and if used incorrectly may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here.

Cancer: 

  • Seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus). Seaweed has many uses on the physical level pertaining to disease and infection. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Carrot seed (Daucus carota). This oil has huge healing potential where an animal is very unwell. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Lemon (Citrus limon). Among its many healing properties along the physical level, Lemon essential oil can be effective in limiting the growth of cancer. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Frankincense (Boswellia carterii). Amongst its ability to support an animal suffering from emotional imbalances, Frankincense can provide pain relief specific to the pain that is being caused by tumors. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale). It is suggested that ginger can support a dog who has cancer, but this may be to provide support of feeling of nausea that the illness or medication may be causing. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

 

Isla Fishburn PhD

There are some other essential oils that can have great effects on killing cancer cells. However, they are very potent and if used incorrectly may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here .”

 

I find it amazing how essential oils can benefit pets in so many ways. If your pet is having ongoing medical issues, I urge you to speak with your holistic veterinarian (a lot do phone consultations) about essential oils. Essential oils may be another module that you can add to your tool box to improve your pet’s health naturally.

Isla Fishburn Ph.D. is a canine wellness practitioner who owns Kachina Canine Communication in Northumberland, United Kingdom. As a canine wellness practitioner, Isla focuses on the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of a dog and how to support your dog in returning him/her back to balance. Isla works with both captive wolves and domestic dogs and teaches canine wellness and balanced behavior courses, consults for a raw food company in the UK and uses a range of holistic therapies to support a dog’s wellness. Isla has a BSc in Zoology and a Masters and PhD in Conservation Biology. She is also a caninepharmacognosy practitioner, offering a range of essential oils to canines to balance their vibrational states and return the animal back to normal functioning.


Have you used essential oils with your pet? Tell me in the comments.

Common essential oils for dogs. Essential oils for dog allergies and itchy skin, ears and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Best Natural Tick Treatment for Dogs using Essential Oils. Natural Tick Spray DIY #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Best Natural Tick Treatment and Spray for Dogs | Essential Oils for Ticks on Dogs DIY

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Essential Oils for Ticks on Dogs

DIY Natural Tick Spray

Best Natural Tick Treatment for Dogs using Essential Oils. Natural Tick Spray DIY #raisingyourpetsnaturally
DIY Tick Spray for Dogs

Over the last 4+ years, I have been using various natural flea and tick sprays for Dexter. It never seemed to matter which one I tried, they all seemed to work well, and WE (I used them too) were tick-and flea-free for those years, until last November when Dexter and I were vacationing in Vermont. I found a tick inside Dexter’s ear flap. We tested for Lyme disease, and he was cleared.

I chalked it up to being in a very high-tick location. But I also thought about the idea that when a dog’s immune system is low, they are more prone to ticks and other parasites. Then it happened again in April—I found a tick sucking on Dexter’s neck. Once again, I waited the 2-3 weeks after the bite to test for Lyme disease, and he is disease-free.

In my heart and head, I don’t think the tick problem really has anything to do with the prevalence of ticks in the area, or Dexter’s daily activities, because those are the same. I feel it has a lot to do with Dexter’s immune system. I’m tackling the ticks naturally in a variety of ways. First, I’m boosting Dexter’s immune system with healthy foods and herbs. I also made an essential oil Immune Booster For Dogs Blend and shampoo. I’ve added 1 tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar to his food two times a day, and feed Dexter one clove of garlic every 4 days.

Next, I made my own natural tick spray using essential oils that I feel are high-quality and safe. I spray the natural tick spray on four hair scrunchies and place them on Dexter’s feet prior to going outside. I also spray Dexter with this DIY natural tick spray and rub throughout his body, including his tail. When we return inside, I comb Dexter to ensure we do not have any hitchhikers. So far, our new regimen has been successful—knock on wood!

Best Natural Tick Treatment for Dogs using Essential Oils. Natural Tick Spray DIY #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Natural Tick Spray DIY

Natural Tick Spray for Dogs

Directions

  1. Place all the ingredients into an 8 oz or larger amber or cobalt glass jar with a sprayer.
  2. Done! Easy-peasy.

Using an amber or cobalt bottle helps ensure the essential oils are properly stored. Light, heat, moisture, and oxygen all affect the oils’ properties and expiration date, so by properly storing your dog’s natural tick spray, you will be able to maintain potency.

6/29/17 Update: I have been spraying Dexter once a day and eliminated the garlic and still tick-free!


Do you hate ticks? Tell me in the comments.

Best Natural Tick Treatment for Dogs using Essential Oils. Natural Tick Spray DIY #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Dog Hear Murmur and Heart Disease in Dogs What You Need To Know. Is your dog prone to congestive heart failure? Learn the facts and how to be proactive in his care. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Heart Disease in Dogs: What You Need To Know | MVD in Dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

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Heart Disease in Dogs: What You Need To Know

MVD in Dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

Dog Hear Murmur and Heart Disease in Dogs What You Need To Know. Is your dog prone to congestive heart failure? Learn the facts and how to be proactive in his care. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
MVD in Dogs

If you are a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel guardian, you should know about heart disease in dogs, particularity degenerative mitral valve disease (MVD). I thought it would be a good idea to interview two of Dexter’s veterinarians: Dexter’s cardiologist, WA Brown, DVM, DACVIM; and his holistic veterinarian, Judy Morgan, DVM, CVA, CVCP, CVFT.

When I’m trying to understand something, I try to get to the root of things. I asked Dr. Brown to explain what MVD in dogs really is and what it does. Dr. Brown explained that “degenerative mitral valve disease is a gradual degeneration of the valve tissue. Cardiac valves are made out of connective tissue. Over the course of several years, the tissue deteriorates and the valve begins to leak. This process most often affects the mitral valve, but it can also involve the tricuspid valve.”

He continues to say, “Certain breeds are considered to be at increased risk for developing degenerative valve disease. Based on this observation, it is clear that genetics plays a role in disease development. While any breed can develop valve disease, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are at greatest risk for developing degenerative mitral valve disease. Other breeds that are commonly affected: Chihuahuas, miniature poodles, all types of terriers, dachshunds, whippets, Shih Tzus. Virtually all breeds of small dogs are commonly seen.”

Dr. Brown says, “The prime determinants of degenerative valve disease seem to be age (increasing risk with increasing age) and genetics (certain breeds have higher risk). At-risk breeds should be closely examined (cardiac auscultation) annually, to determine if they have a murmur. The presence of a murmur is often the first sign that a dog has degenerative valve disease.”

Because Cavaliers have a high risk of developing heart disease, I have always been proactive with caring and monitoring Dexter’s heart. Starting at Dexter’s first birthday, he has had yearly cardiac auscultations from a veterinary cardiologist. Around age five, it was determined that Dexter had some premature heart beats. We decided to do an echocardiogram to evaluate his heart size, heart function, and blood flow. We also did a 24-hour Holter monitor that measured and recorded Dexter’s heart’s activity (ECG). I wanted to know all I could about what was going on with Dexter’s heart, so I could make the best choices for his care and support.

Dog Hear Murmur and Heart Disease in Dogs What You Need To Know. Is your dog prone to congestive heart failure? Learn the facts and how to be proactive in his care. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Holter Heart Monitor

Everything turned out okay, without any sign of a heart murmur. As Dr. Brown said, “The presence of a murmur is often the first sign that a dog has degenerative valve disease.” At this time, he did not have a murmur. Our take-home was to reevaluate the following year, unless one of Dexter’s vets heard anything unusual during our quarterly visits.

Since Dexter had the very beginnings of MVD, it was time to talk to his holistic veterinarian, Dr. Judy Morgan, about what kinds of foods and supplements I should be adding to Dexter’s routine to be as heart-healthy as I possibly could.

Dr. Morgan explains, “From a Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) perspective, the Heart dominates the Blood and vessels, houses the Minds, controls sweat, and opens into the tongue (voice). The heart governs the circulation of blood through the vessels by having healthy Heart Qi, or energy. The blood supplies nutrients to cells throughout the body. A patient with Deficient Heart Qi and Blood will have weak, thready pulses, and pale color tongue and gums.”

She continues to say, “The Shen is best translated as the Spirit or Mind. The Heart plays a role in mental activities, memory, and sleep. Deficiency in Heart Blood can disrupt normal mental function, resulting in abnormal behaviors such as restlessness or anxiety. Rapid heart rate, irregular heart rhythm, and pale tongue may be present. The tongue is the opening associated with the heart. Heart controls the color and appearance of the tongue at the tip of the tongue. A pale tongue indicates Deficient Heart Blood and a dark red tongue tip reveals Heat accumulation in the Heart.

Heart Qi Deficiency is seen in MVD, usually in older animals as a result of the gradual decline of the Heart Qi. It can also be due to a genetic predilection, as a result of an underlying Jing Deficiency. Symptoms include heart rhythm abnormalities, difficult respiration, generalized weakness, fatigue, exercise intolerance, and fainting. Tongue will be pale to purple, and pulse will be weak. The body tends to become cold and there is excess accumulation of fluids (fluid can be in the lungs or abdomen – ascites).”

Feeding a dog a high-quality home-cooked or raw dog food is ideal for a dog with heart disease. A mantra I hear from Dr. Morgan all the time is “like feeds like.” For this instance, feeding a dog a quality diet that includes heart muscle is recommended.

In Dr. Morgan’s book, From Needles To Natural, she also suggests adding hawthorn berry, as it widens the coronary arteries and boosts blood circulation and can help regulate abnormal rhythms. She also recommends supplements such as CoQ10, L-arginine, L-carnitine, taurine, chromium, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Dog Hear Murmur and Heart Disease in Dogs What You Need To Know. Is your dog prone to congestive heart failure? Learn the facts and how to be proactive in his care. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
TCMV Theory

Because I knew Cavaliers are prone to heart disease, Dexter was already getting a lot of these supplements and foods. Dr. Morgan and I did tweak his maintenance dose to more of a therapeutic dose with his diagnosis.

I continued to see Dr. Brown for Dexter’s yearly cardiac auscultation. This year (age 7.5), his premature heartbeats officially turned into a grade 1 heart murmur. I have to admit, even though I knew we were heading this way, my heart still sank at the news.

Dr. Brown explained to me how murmurs are graded. “Murmurs are graded on a scale from 1 to 6. The number simply denotes the loudness (or intensity of the murmur). It does not describe the disease severity. Grade 1-2 murmurs are soft. Grade 3-4 murmurs are moderately loud. Grade 5-6 murmurs are very loud and are associated with a vibration on the chest (a palpable thrill). While it is true that louder murmurs are a bigger concern, it would be wrong to assume that the loudness of the murmur equates with the severity of the disease.”

While I was trying to comprehend that Dexter officially had a heart murmur, I also wanted to know what I need to look for and be aware of throughout his life. I didn’t want to miss a sign that he was in distress or declining.

Dr. Brown explains, “Unfortunately, all of the clinical signs associated with heart disease come at the end of the disease process. Most dogs remain asymptomatic as the disease is developing. Coughing, labored breathing, weakness, collapse, and exercise intolerance are associated with congestive heart failure. Again, congestive heart failure occurs after a patient has already developed severe, advanced disease. Pet owners should be aware that “the absence of clinical signs” does not guarantee that their pet does not have a serious cardiac condition. As with many diseases, early treatment is recommended for the best outcome and long-term survival.”

At this time, Dr. Brown wants to see Dexter again in a year to assess his heart. If any of Dexter’s vets see a change in his heart, we will do it sooner. I will continue to feed Dexter a high-quality, home-cooked diet, provide him with heart-healthy supplements and foods, continue to ensure he receives adequate exercise, and keep him at his ideal weight.

If you have a dog prone to heart disease, such as a Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Chihuahua, miniature poodle, terrier, dachshund, whippet, or Shih Tzu, you should look into a yearly visit with a veterinary cardiologist. Or if your dog exhibits coughing, labored breathing, weakness, collapse, or exercise intolerance, please have a conversation with your veterinarian about heart disease. Remember, our pets are counting on us to be their advocates.


Do you have a dog breed prone to heart disease? Tell me in the comments.

Dog Hear Murmur and Heart Disease in Dogs What You Need To Know. Is your dog prone to congestive heart failure? Learn the facts and how to be proactive in his care. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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Are essential oils for dogs, cats, and pets safe? Learn how to use essential oils safely with your pets to help with anxiety, allergies, fleas and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Essential Oils for Dogs, Cats, and Pets an Interview with Isla Fishburn Ph.D.

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Essential Oils for Dogs, Cats, and Pets

Are Essential Oils Safe for Dogs and Cats? What You Need To Know

Are essential oils for dogs, cats, and pets safe? Learn how to use essential oils safely with your pets to help with anxiety, allergies, fleas and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Essential Oils and Pets

Over the years I’ve had a lot of clients ask me about essential oils for dogs and cats. There is no doubt that essential oils have a lot of health benefits for people and also help many pets. You may find essential oils in a lot of pet products such as essential oils for fleas, dog allergies, ear infections, itchy skin, and to help with anxiety. But are essential oils safe for dogs and cats? This has been my burning question over the years.

When I’m helping pet clients, my first rule is “Do no harm.” Essential oils are very concentrated and most definitely come with some precautions and no-nos for pets and people. Instead of jumping on the bandwagon, I’ve spent the last year researching essential oils for pets by attending some online workshops, reading articles on essential oils and pets, and reading books about essential oils for pets. Today, I want to share with you the first article in a three-part series on essential oils for pets with Isla Fishburn Ph.D. Isla has a BSc in Zoology and a Masters and Ph.D. in Conservation Biology. She is also a canine pharmacognosy practitioner, offering a range of essential oils to canines to balance their vibrational states and return the animal back to normal functioning.

Basics of Essential Oils and Pets by Isla Fishburn Ph.D. Part 1

“Essential oils are a fantastic and natural alternative or support to allopathic drugs – they are what tribal people have been using for thousands of years to heal themselves, way before pharmaceutical drugs were even available. As holistic and natural approaches to health once again becomes more common, there has been an increased interest in the health and healing benefits that essential oils can offer, not just for humans put for beloved pets too.

Everything that is living emits a vibrational frequency. When the body is balanced and healthy, the vibrational frequency resonates within a particular range. Yet, when imbalances within the body arise, the normal vibrational frequency begins to alter, becoming either too elevated or too low. If left for too long, or if further imbalances occur, then the disharmony generated can affect the body; emotionally, physically, physiologically, energetically and spiritually.

As living beings, plants too emit their own vibrational frequency. As highly concentrated forms of plant energy, essential oils carry their own vibrational frequencies. Essential oils can provide incredible healing benefits because of their potency and vibrational power. Essential oils work at a cellular level, supporting the balance of or increasing or decreasing the vibrational frequency of the individual to return it to normal function. Many essential oils have a bidirectional effect, meaning they can raise or lower the vibrational frequency of the individual to regain balance at the physical, mental, emotional or spiritual level.

Essential oil compounds are very powerful and even tiny amounts can have a big impact on every level of the body. For example, one drop of rose essential oil is suggested to have the same therapeutic value of 25 cups of rose herbal infusion. That is why they come with a caution. If not given correctly, oils can be extremely toxic or over use can cause sensitivities, even through inhalation alone. A good simple guide is, if your pet resists in any way to the oil, then stop using it and always make sure your pet has access to a space that is essential oil free. If your pet does have a topical application of essential oil and does not want this on them then DO NOT use water to wipe this off. Essential oils are hydrophobic, meaning they repel water and will seep further into the skin of your pet. Instead, to wipe away an essential oil you need to use a liquid that has a fat content itself, such as yogurt, milk or butter. Being lipophilic (liking fat) the essential oil will absorb into the fatty liquid being used to wipe the area clean.

Are essential oils for dogs, cats, and pets safe? Learn how to use essential oils safely with your pets to help with anxiety, allergies, fleas and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Organic essential oils for pets

When it comes to our pet’s health, we can use essential oils in a particular way; a way that allows your pet to choose what s/he needs for healing via the route of self-selection. This works on a vibrational level; the receptors on the dog’s cells are either attracted to an essential oil (if needed) or repelled by an essential oil (if not needed). The selection process is involuntary and based on how the vibrational energy of the essential oil and the vibrational energy of your pet “speak” to each other. Essential oils are strong, and with your pet’s super sense of smell, s/he will be able to smell the oil even from an unopened bottle. If you’re applying topically, make sure you avoid all the sensitive areas on your pet such as the eyes, nose and genital areas and make sure your dog REALLY does want the oil applied topically; cats should NEVER make direct contact with an essential oil so use these via inhalation only.

To steal the words of holistic vet Randy Kidd, “All medicine works…some of the time…in some animals.” There are numerous therapies available today that can improve the wellness of your pet and essential oils are just one of them. Powerful they are and life-changing they can be, but a cure-all they are not. When using essential oils to improve health, we must also choose to adopt a holistic approach to wellness otherwise you can run the risk of canceling out any good that the oils are doing; looking into the diet, exercise, environment and stress of your pet need to be considered also. Sometimes, it does no harm to “power up” the healing effect of the oils by using other therapies alongside, such as massage, acupuncture, nutrition etc.

The examples of how essential oils alone have supported pets (and other animals) across the globe are staggering; anything from speeding up the healing process of cuts and wounds to destroying life-threatening diseases in an individual, such as cancer. There are examples of pets receiving pain relief, digestive support, improved appetite, incontinence, skin irritations, ear infections, cancers, internal bleeding, bacterial and viral infections, diarrhea, noise phobias, trauma, aggression and fear, anxiety, hormone balance, pregnancy and birthing to name but a few. If your pet has a problem, whether physical, emotional or otherwise it really is worth considering how essential oils can support and improve your dog in returning back to normal health.

You must make sure that the essential oil you are using is of therapeutic quality. What typically guarantees this is if the oil is certified as organic, but be sure to check with the company. Never be fooled by cheap essential oils, they are usually tampered with in some way, making the oil ineffective and even possibly dangerous to use for healing purposes. In addition, an essential oil should always state its Latin name on the bottle so that you can be sure you are buying the right one (different regions may use the same English name for different plants). If you are not sure about what a certain oil should cost, find several companies that sell the essential oil and compare prices. Those that are priced at the higher end are likely to be therapeutic. If you are still not sure then ask the professional you are working with.

A cat should only ever be allowed to inhale an essential oil. Topical application or ingestion should be avoided. With dogs, all three routes can be used; inhalation, topical or ingestion, but NEVER add an essential oil to a dog’s food or to items such as a collar or bed, unless you have been instructed to do so or unless the dog can move away from it if/when the oil is no longer needed. In addition, NEVER apply an essential oil topically unless the dog appears to want it applied via this route of application. Often, you will see a dog sniff the essential oil and either move a body part closer to you that they want the essential oil applied on, or point with their muzzle to where they want it applied. Sometimes, a dog is less obvious and whilst a dog may be asking for the oil to be applied topically, you may have to work slower in observing where the dog wants it applied. Slow and steady observation is key here, a slight movement or change in the body can be an indication. Your pet must ALWAYS be able to walk away from an essential oil and have access to another room or part of the house if they do not want to be near the essential oil.

 

Are essential oils for dogs, cats, and pets safe? Learn how to use essential oils safely with your pets to help with anxiety, allergies, fleas and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
Isla Fishburn PhD

If the dog wants an essential oil applied topically this can be applied undiluted, but PLEASE only do so if you are familiar with the practice of Zoopharmacognosy or are working with a similar professional. In my experience, most dogs that have selected for topical application do so with the oil being applied undiluted. Even those oils that can irritate the skin do not do so if the dog has selected to have these applied topically. Of course, we must be cautious if an essential oil is photo-reactive or a known irritant. There are some dogs that appear to want an essential oil applied topically, yet become reserved when trying to apply this undiluted. In these circumstances we can dilute the essential oil in a pure aloe vera and water solution then observe if the dog wants this applied topically. If I am making up a dilution I usually use my crystal pendulum to dowse and find out how many drops of essential oil I should add to the aloe vera and water mix. Every dog is an individual and different dilutions will be required for each dog.

 

If a dog wants to ingest an essential oil, then the dog will usually lick it, but allow this to be the dog’s choice – just one lick can have the necessary effect needed for the dog (remember essential oils are highly concentrated forms of plant energy). If a dog wants to inhale the oil, they may move their nose to and from the bottle as they vary the distance they wish to work with the aroma; sometimes what appears to be a dog uninterested in the oil is actually the opposite, but the oil may be too close so the dog is adjusting to the distance it would like to work with the essential oil. A dog may inhale an essential oil, move off and lie down. This is a sign that the dog is working with the oil. Other responses include the dog lying next to the essential oil and going in to a deep trance, falling asleep, blinking lots or closing eyes tight, yawning, gulping, whining, drooling, licking or changing its breathing rhythm.”

I loved how Isla explained how essential oils can be used to help balance the body. This is the cornerstone of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory. And remember, essential oils are very powerful and can be toxic if not used properly. When considering using essential oils with pets, please work with a practitioner that specializes in essential oils and pets.

Isla Fishburn Ph.D. is a canine wellness practitioner who owns Kachina Canine Communication in Northumberland, United Kingdom. As a canine wellness practitioner, Isla focuses on the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of a dog and how to support your dog in returning him/her back to balance. Isla works with both captive wolves and domestic dogs and teaches canine wellness and balanced behavior courses, consults for a raw food company in the UK and uses a range of holistic therapies to support a dog’s wellness. Isla has a BSc in Zoology and a Masters and PhD in Conservation Biology. She is also a caninepharmacognosy practitioner, offering a range of essential oils to canines to balance their vibrational states and return the animal back to normal functioning.


Have you used essential oils on yourself or your pets? Tell me in the comments.

Are essential oils for dogs, cats, and pets safe? Learn how to use essential oils safely with your pets to help with anxiety, allergies, fleas and more. #raisingyourpetsnaturally #essentialoils #eos #essentialoilsforpets #essentialoilsfordogs
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If you have old dogs or special needs dogs, you won't want to miss this interview with Dr. Julie Buzby. Learn how to prevent your dog from slipping on hardwood floors. Click to help your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally

Senior and Special Needs Dogs an Interview with Dr. Julie Buzby founder of Toegrips for Dogs

Products for Special Needs Dogs and Senior Dogs

An Interview with Dr. Julie Buzby founder of Toegrips for Dogs

 

A few weeks ago, I attended the BlogPaws 2017 conference in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This was the first blogging conference I’ve attended. I guess blogging is getting real for me. 😉 I wanted to attend this blogging conference for three reasons: 1) It was in Myrtle Beach! 2) I wanted to learn more about being an effective pet blogger. And 3) I wanted to meet Dr. Julie Buzby, the founder of Dr. Buzby’s Toegrips for Dogs.

About eight months ago, Dexter wore his first pair of Toegrips, and these little rubber grips have transformed his life. You can read how in my November blog post. Today, I wanted to share my interview with Dr. Buzby. Enjoy.

The word on the street is that Dr. Buzby has two more products up her sleeve! Dexter and I are waiting on pins and needles to see what she has next.


Would your dog benefit from Toegrips? Tell me in the comments.

If you have old dogs or special needs dogs, you won't want to miss this interview with Dr. Julie Buzby. Learn how to prevent your dog from slipping on hardwood floors. Click to help your dog. #raisingyourpetsnaturally
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I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.

Dog Swimming | How To Teach A Dog To Swim

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Raising Your Pets, Dogs and Cats Naturally

How To Teach A Dog To Swim

Dog Swimming 101

I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.
Dog Swimming

Growing up, I loved to swim. I spent every summer day at the local pool from 12-5 and 6-8. When we went to our friend’s cabin on the lake, I spent my days swimming and swimming some more. If I wasn’t swimming, I was walking along the shoreline with my dog, Toby, and the other dogs staying at the cabin. I still have a great fondness for water, but for whatever reason, I’m not a swimmer anymore. I do, however, still love walking the water’s edge and going knee-high to investigate what the water has to offer.

When I brought my golden retriever, Theo, into my life, I thought he would just take to the water and swim without any issues. He did take to the water right away, but he would only go chest-high. He did not want to take that last step where his feet would not touch the ground. The same was true when Dexter came into my life.

Today, I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Ideally, find a place in the water that has a gradual decline instead of a drop-off. This will allow you and your dog plenty of fun foot action, and help your dog get comfortable bouncing around in the water and having water splash around his face. Find something your dog thinks is exciting and interesting, and do a little play in the shallows. Maybe it’s a twig that you wiggle around on top of the water, enticing him to investigate and maybe grab. If your dog is a foodie, try luring him to take a few steps in the water, then treat him.

Once your dog is happy frolicking in the water, it’s time to take that first step into no man’s land. If your dog is chasing and retrieving a toy in the shallows, toss the toy about 2 feet past the point where he can touch. If he’s ready, he will go for it! Encourage him as he comes back with the toy. Repeat.

I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.
Dexter Learning To Swim

If your dog isn’t retrieving in the water, squat down with him in the water and place your hands under his belly, gently moving him toward the deeper water, just a foot or two. Keep your arms under his belly for security as he gets his water feet going and doesn’t seem panicked. As you are supporting your dog in the water, turn him toward shore and let him go alone. Again, this is only about 2 feet from the point where he is able to touch the bottom. Repeat this process as he gets comfortable.

I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.
Dog Swimming

A good tip for some dogs is to use a dog life jacket. Because a life jacket proves support and the ability to float, some dogs feel much more secure wearing them while they swim, particularly in the beginning stages.

Precautions and things to consider. If your dog just doesn’t seem that interested in swimming, so be it! Theo loved to swim—I had a hard time keeping him out of the water. Dexter, on the other hand, is a mucker. He likes wading in the water and walking the shoreline, but he prefers not to swim.

I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.
Dexter Chillin’

Also, watch out for signs of water intoxication when your dog is swimming and playing in the water. Water intoxication or hyponatremia in dogs can be life threatening. According to Dr. Karen Becker, “Hyponatremia occurs when more water enters the body than it can process. The presence of so much water dilutes bodily fluids, creating a potentially dangerous shift in electrolyte balance. The excess water depletes sodium levels in extracellular fluid (fluid outside of cells). Sodium maintains blood pressure and nerve and muscle function.”

Who’s at risk for water intoxication? We all are, if we drink too much water too quickly. Babies and smaller-breed dogs are at a higher-risk due to their size, but all breeds and all sizes can develop water intoxication. Dr. Becker explains, “Any dog can develop hyponatremia; however, the condition is most commonly seen in dogs who will stay in the lake, pond, or pool all day if you let them; pets that lap or bite at the water continuously while playing in it; and dogs that swallow water unintentionally as they dive for a ball or other toy.” If your dog is acting strangely when playing in the water, vomits, or seems lethargic or uncoordinated, seek immediate veterinary care.

Remember, all dog activities and dog games need to be played with care and rest.

Water Intoxification: Dr. Karen Becker


Did you teach your dog to swim? Was he a natural swimmer, or did he just say ‘no, thanks’?  Tell me in the comments.

I want to share with you how I taught my dogs to swim with confidence. Learn how to teach your dog to swim.
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